Confectionery packaging driven by reduced portion sizes

Demand for packaging across the retail sector for confectionery has been reported at 354.5 billion units for 2016, according to latest research. Confectionery packaging driven by reduced portion sizes

Demand for packaging across the retail sector for confectionery has been reported at 354.5 billion units for 2016, according to latest research.

The study from Euromonitor confirmed the food sector was the primary industry end-use, which grew alongside an increased call for smaller portion sizes across confectionery, bakery and wider food sectors.

Some of the key drivers of reduced portion sizes have included health concerns, affordability and development of premium development. 

The figures for confectionery contrasted with 141 billion units for the bakery industry in 2016, from an overall total of 3.4 trillion for the year for all sectors of industry.

According to the report, chocolate confectionery’s strongest global growth to 2020 in consumer purchases of tablets is set to be in the 0-50g size band. This smaller size trend is accelerating volume growth for flexible packaging; also true of countlines, in which Nestlé launched KitKat in a 17g flexible plastic pack in Vietnam in 2016.

Rosemarie Downey, head of packaging at Euromonitor International, said: “Rightsizing is a key packaging strategy being used by brands, with diversification rather than standardisation the new order of the day. This is intrinsically translated into a shift towards smaller sizes and a wider range of pack sizes, enabling brands to be more customised in addressing consumers’ healthier consumption requirements across food and soft drinks.

“The trend favouring smaller, measured portions is forecast to continue, as brand owners look to address governments’ concerns, via sugar ‘sin’ tax legislation in a number of countries, and meet consumers’ concern for healthy variants and alternatives, given the rising incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease.”
According to the Euromonitor analyst, within the biscuit sector, single-serve options have provided consumers with an increasingly popular alternative to chocolate bars in terms of impulse purchases by consumers.

Downey added: “In 2016, Mondelez in Malaysia launched Mini Oreo sweet biscuits in a 38g pack, while Swiss retailer Migros introduced Blévita Biscuits Müesli Mini sweet biscuits in 38g flexible plastic.

“The move towards smaller sizes extends to ice cream, where the miniaturisation trend continues. In impulse ice cream, while 80ml is the most common pack size, globally the 0-50ml size band is forecast the most dynamic growth, of a 7% CAGR over 2016-2020, helping consumers to exercise restraint when it comes to indulging in their favourite ice cream.”

Share this news story

Recent Articles